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  • #5856
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator
    Quote:
    Why is her skin pale blue? Is everyone from the “grim land of Spol” blue? Certainly she is not of Veldang heritage. I have searched through the limited material concerning Spol and Carmania and haven’t found anything suggesting the inhabitants have blue skin. Just wondering.

    Erianda is an assassin, and her skin color might denote some connection with the Blue Moon assassins who worship Annilla. If so, her skin color might denote a physical manifestation of her allegiance, much as her exposure to Lunar magic has affected her sanity.

    #5855
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator
    Quote:
    The reason I went for a bigger army than this is by comparing it with ancient armies though I know there is no reason that Gloranthan armies shouldn’t be smaller. I reckoned that if Ptolemy IV could use 70 000 infantry and 5000 cavalry at Raphia from a population of about 7 million that the Lunar Empire with a population similar to Ptolemaic Egypt should be able to field a similar army. This was a major effort by Ptolemy but didn’t constitute his whole army as he still had to defend his other frontiers.

    Bear in mind that the size of armies in antiquity were often subject to considerable exaggeration, by historians and the states they served, to give really impressive (but in reality highly impractical) numbers. Even when a force existed on paper (or parchment, papyrus or clay tablet, as appropriate) it did not mean that a unit of that strength was available. Desertions, deceased, injured or sick troops, or even fraud would cut back the actual numbers, and some units listed on paper might be nothing more than that.

    When ancient sources start to give troop numbers of tens of thousands they become increasingly unreliable, simply down to the logistical issues of maintaining a force of that size in the field. Even when the size of individual units is given (in suspiciously round hundreds or thousands very often) it is highly debatable as to how that paper strength mapped onto actual numbers of troops.

    This is even more true for societies that lacked the bureaucratic infrastructure of the Near East: there’s good reason to believe that in many of the battles in Anglo-Saxon England, for example, between the Saxons and the Danes, the great armies actually consisted of fewer than a hundred men on each size: often probably barely thirty.

    #5748
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    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Whilst it may not be entirely accurate, if you want to convey the horror of broo reproduction without going into graphic detail an out-of-game note about the real-world species of wasps that utilize spiders as living hosts for their larva, or a certain popular sci-fi xenomorph with a similar lifecycle might suffice. Not quite the same as Broo reproduction, but nasty enough.

    If something is going to derail game play, then don’t show: have NPCs mention the many vile habits of broo but blanch at describing the fate of livestock. An NPC farmer noting how a certain Broo raider killed a few years ago resembled his lost livestock might suffice. And then I knew what had happened to my cow… And then refuses to say anything more.

    #5744
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Something that would add ‘character’ to the various regiments would be their traditional battle cries, which would display their historical/religious background. Such war cries are mentioned in the Iliad, and that was certainly an account of a war of heroes.

    Both the Greeks and Akkadians are said to have uttered Alala as a war cry; for the Greeks it supposedly (and probably retrospectively) derived from the name of the daughter of Polemos, the daemon of war; she was a member of the entourage of Ares. The word for warrior is very similar.

    “Harken! O Alala, daughter of war! Prelude of spears! To whom soldiers are sacrificed for their city’s sake in the holy sacrifice of death.” – Pindar – a fragment of Dithyrambs.

    #5674
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator
    Quote:
    From Charles Olson, the Maximus Poems: Peloria
    “…I am making a mappemunde. It is to include my being.
    It is called here, at this point and point of time
    Peloria.”

    A pelorus was a type of navigation device used to take relative bearings, supposedly named for a navigator employed by Hannibal, recounted by Pomponius Mela’s Description of the World.

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=6AplSod8IDcC&pg=PA100&dq=Hannibal+pelorus&hl=fr&sa=X&ei=ck8YUYPPJOK5ywHL-oDoDQ&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Hannibal%20pelorus&f=false

    And in Greek pelor meant ‘monster’, and peloria is now used to describe a mutation in flowering plants…

    #5673
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Peloria(s) was one of the Latin names for Punta del Faro, the northeastern promontory of Sicily; Carmania (Karmania) was the Greek name for a region of southern Persia, now called Kerman.

    #5651
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Gravity works not through the physics of mass and gravity, but through the attraction and love embodied by Uleria: the Earth attracts objects not because of its mass, but because of its love.

    #5648
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    The Gloranthan ‘monomyth’ is full of contradictions, which is entirely valid, as any sophisticated culture is going to have its own perspectives, interpretations and approach, even between those that share a basic worldview. Attempting to force the myths of diverse cultures and species to full equivalence is doomed to failure, and reeks of God Learnerism. And we all know how that went…

    This actually makes Glorantha’s mythic background more ‘real’ as unlike the majority of fantasy worlds, real world myth cycles weren’t (and aren’t) fully compatible. It’s possible to synthesize vaguely similar deities, as the Romans did throughout Europe, the Near East and North Africa, but if you spend any time wandering around, for example, the Roman period temples of Egypt, you’ll see some really odd results. Some of the ornamentation is obviously Egyptian, and would have been familiar to an Egyptian of an earlier period, but there are weird hybrids of Greek or Roman origin that would strike them as utterly alien.

    Even when there are close historical similarities, Roman Jupiter isn’t exactly Greek Zeus, who isn’t Dyaus Pita, and despite Roman and Greek belief isn’t Amun.

    #5638
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Before Time, a moon goddess fell to earth, crushing Mernita, according to some sources. The Red Goddess is an ancient moon goddess reborn in Time, or at least portions of her.

    #5608
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    The blood of storm gods will be scattered all over Glorantha, and flint thunderstones, the crystallized blood of storm gods, will be common in some areas. It’s no surprise that the contact for hiring the Thunder Delta slingers is called Mrs. Flint.

    In terrestrial folklore Stone Age flint arrow heads were often thought to be the result of thunderbolts hitting the Earth.

    #5604
    Profile photo of Martin Helsdon
    Martin Helsdon
    Spectator

    Comes the lustrous solar son once pent in hell,
    Iniquitous umbral emperor he must quell.

    In all directions four hands of wickedness bestow,
    From waxing rock-strewn isle emerging below.

Viewing 11 posts - 121 through 131 (of 131 total)

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