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  • #11020
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    Kralorela is full of wuxia style martial artists, and there are many throughout the East Isles as well. The Kralori state is xenophobic and isolationist, but not all Kralori are. Kralori merchants travel widely, especially by sea. And a Kralori adventurer could have many reasons to travel, strange and frightening prophecies are the order of the day in Kralorela.

    While Arcane Lore is not canon, and much of its content is old and outdated, it does mention a smallish (2,000 total) martial arts organisation called the Red Dragon Servants, who came to Dragon pass from Kralorela, presumably to be near the Red Dragon (called Krisa Oraba there, though the Red Dragon of Dragon Pass is called Krisa Yor elsewhere). They have a monastery in Karse, and a temple and dojo near Furthest in Tarsh. It is certainly possible that a group of Kralori could have travelled to Dragon Pass to seek out a dragon in the past. The Red Dragon servants are martial artists who fight with swords (they have a Strike Dead with Sword magic) and can self-heal as well as defensive magic.

    Of course Orlanthi will be very wary of a stranger, but a good warrior in bad times is often appreciated.

    #11019
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    The magic gained by Seven Mothers initiates from their non-Lunar Runes is specified on pg 398 of the Pavis book – while there is a somewhat confusing section about the additional runes associated with the individual Mothers, there are clear descriptions of the magic available from the Life or Death runes.

    #10982
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    I think an item as a lingering benefit works well. It makes an item seem very useful and effective, but makes it easy to write it out of the story – of course your defeat in combat may be accompanied by a weapon being taken or destroyed, etc. Which makes them seem a useful and meaningful part of the story, but without having them accumulate. Of course, characters can cement it if they’d rather.

    I also like the idea of powerful magic items as companions, the way the sword Wrath is done in Sartar: KoH, but I find my players tend to get overexcited about this option and want to use it a little too much!

    #10981
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    To clarify and rephrase, I took the question to be asking not really about evocations, but to essentially be : if an initiate of a Lunar cult uses a rune other than the Moon Rune to create magic, such as an initiate of the Seven Mothers using the Life or Death runes as a rune affinity (as descibed on Pavis pg 398), or an initiate of one of the Little Sister cults, is that magic Lunar cyclical?
    The rules in Pavis do seem to imply that only magic that uses the Moon Rune (of whatever phase, or whether it is an Evocation, Lunar Grimoire, or Lune) is controlled by the cyclic.

    #7572
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    I hadn’t remembered any references to incense among the Orlanthi, and sure enough, the few references I could find are mostly to Pelorian worship, but it is mentioned in Kingdom of Sartar as a type of small everyday sacrifice. I suspect it might be something that has crept into Sartarite Earth worship from other regions, but isn’t really part of the Orlanth tradition (why would you mix the smoke that results from fire and ‘earth’ in with perfectly good air?)

    #7435
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    And then there is the bleak Vadeli variant – identity and individuality whatever, people are Matter and Energy, spirits are Energy, both Matter and Energy may be manipulated by those who have the ability. Gods are higher level abstractions through which Matter and Energy might be manipulated more effectively.

    #7419
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    Harald and Charles –
    I think it likely that one way sorcerers navigate the otherworld is with reference to elaborate tables of correspondences and symbolic interpretations. They must interpret (logically in theory, but in practice often by reference to exhaustive lists that may need to be memorised) what the significance of the door being made of chrysopase is, or why that angel has the head of a cuckoo and a voice like a trumpet, and has precisely 19 points on its crown. For example there are encyclopedias of such correspondences worked out according to kabbalistic numerology (Godwin’s Caballistic Encyclopedia is a well known one).

    As far as mysticism goes – I think that starting with practice in another form of practice, and then moving into mysticism is probably a common form of practice, as it is for real world mysticism, but I doubt it is the only one. And explicitly being offered and rejecting power is one form of austerity, but not the only one – other forms of mysticism may reject worldly power in less magical but more direct ways, such as by just sitting and doing nothing for a few years. Or subtler ways, such as being content to keep doing the thing you are doing.

    #7418
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    I think that there is no single right way to do theism, or shamanism, or sorcery, or mysticism. Many paths don’t neatly fit into that classification. It is not objectively better to be a shaman that fights spirits, or that befriends and bargains with them )or both). Theist traditions may have have dionysian abandon, or apollonian reverence. Sorcerers may be henotheist, or a pure sorcerer, or a demonologist, and practice may involve unworldly exercises to strengthen the mind, or alchemical experiment. Even the vilest (the Vadeli, for instance) have a consistent worldview that they have evidence to believe is correct. There are different forms of practice within the Big Four traditions, and different forms of practice that cross the boundaries cheerily and don’t see any inconsistency in doing so.
    But this doesn’t mean anything goes. There is no single true practice, but there is most definitely a correct and incorrect way to do things within your practice. And doing it wrongly according to the rules of your practice will have consequences, often dire ones. The correct way of doing things within your practice is complicated, and we can only sketch out the outlines, but suffice to say there are many subtle errors as well as overt ones. And that is precisely why most traditions, of whatever kind, involve the hierarchical transmission of knowledge (be it via a master student relationship, strict rules, exhaustive books of instruction, etc) to guide the novice in the avoidance of error.

    #7415
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    Huh. I’d never connected Gunda with the woman who swims ashore at Corflu, but of course it makes perfect sense.

    I’ve always wanted to know a little more about the Queen of the Kiss, who I’ve always associated with Zoria, but I’m unsure whether the Queen is the same person as the rule of that city.

    #7411
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    David Cake
    Spectator
    Quote:
    This was something previous rules systems made way too big of a deal, and forced epistemological certainty on something that should always beyond certainty.

    Let me be another to agree with this sentiment, and thank you Jeff for expressing it so succinctly. I never liked the idea that some Gloranthan practices were just empirically verifiably wrong (the whole idea of misapplied worship). Or that virtually all ‘correct’ Gloranthan (or RW, for that matter) religious practices could be neatly categorised. One thing I really like about the current material is that it is seen as quite natural and common for many religions to have practices that blur the boundaries between two forms of magical practice to some degree (as Pavis, Lhankor Mhy, Odayla, and Urox all do in published sources to far).

    #7410
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    The similarities between the Chariot of Lightning sects inner sorcerous tradition, and that of the Orgethite school of sorcery (air based, declared Air to be greater than other elements) can’t be just coincidence, especially as both are from Ralios, albeit separated by more 1400 years or so. Perhaps Surantyr studied those ancient grimoires, or they even form the core texts of his sorcerous teaching. Which would make the school have deep roots indeed.
    (while the the Orgethite texts were declared heretical back then, it was by some First Age Hrestoli types, so that hardly matters)

    And let me add my voice both to agree with Jonathon that the link to the merkavah mysticism is a very fruitful one (I’ve often thought that kabbalistic texts are among the most useful sources to mine for ideas about Gloranthan sorcery), and to praise his rather fine writings.

    #7307
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    Pg 742 – 744. Several of the plates referenced in the text do not appear to be there. Text references plates 30-40 inclusive, but only plates 30,34, 36, 38, 40 appear. If this is intentional, it should be at least explained better in the text, as it is confusing.

    Jeff Sez: The Cryptic Verses are a series of 42 allegorical drawings or plates, the details of which only 30 through 40 7 are known. The images of only 7 plates are shown – I don’t think we need to explain that only those plates that are depicted are depicted.

    #7301
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    David Cake
    Spectator

    Naiad is misspelled Niiad in the entry for Deeper on page 706.

    RICK SEZ: Fixed.

    #7299
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    Pg 526, in the history section “This land was inhabited by a people called the Vadeli, the children the demigod Vadel, son of Vimorn and the goddess Vadela.” should be the “the children of the demigod”

    RICK SEZ: Fixed.

    #7271
    Profile photo of David Cake
    David Cake
    Spectator

    Unless directly opposing a chaotic threat, many Arkati quests will be quests of the various cults Arkat joined, but with an Arkati twist. There is a tiny bit of info in Arcane Lore that indicates it was thought about, but not much filled in (pg 38), and indicates that the majro Arkati heroquests are heroquests of other cults reused.
    So in his troll period, Arkat performed the Hill of Gold quest, presumably playing the Zorak Zoran role, but, the quest might differ – the Arkati may know how to navigate the Orlanthi parts of the quest non-violently, and the Yelmalio antagonist may be more Daysenarus/Nysalorian. Arkati might also teach Arkati versions of Brithini quests, such as the Horali weapon tests, and the Hrestol quest to become a Man Of All (which involves visiting the Court of Silence in the underworld, and performing four caste dependent tests in a cross shape before a final challenge in the centre) – the Arkati might be less interested in the transcending of social status that is so significant to the West, and more interested in using that ritual to obtain a Sword of Justice, or access the powers of the Crusade.
    The same theme of repurposing existing quests should give you lots of options. Kygor Litor or Zorak Zoran quest against chaos, but with an additional step of unmasking the hidden chaos before it can be destroyed. A Humakti quest might be followed to gain death powers.
    Note the tricks Arkati can play – both Zorak Zoran and Humakt can enter the court of Kargan Tor – an Arkati might know means to enter on one path, and leave on another. He might enter via a ZZ quest (and so can enter with community support, via known troll rituals), but while he is there demand the right to try to learn Humakts Battle Rage or Mighty Blows quests from Humakt. Or use Humakti rituals to enter Hell, but take a different path once there to meet and perhaps ally trolls or darkness demons (that the Humakti would have to avoid or fight).
    One particularly interesting mythological cross-over – in Cults of Terror, it is said that Kygor Litor teaches Zzabur how to overcome the Silence that plagued him. While Zzabur no doubt tells the story differently, this cross over between troll and Western myth could form the basis of a fun Arkati heroquest.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)

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