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  • #6042
    Quote:
    Quote from Jeff Richard on October 11, 2013, 09:11
    The previous incarnations of Belintar are worshipped as gods in the Holy Country. They get their own temples, and the priests of Belintar offer them sacrifices. Upon death they do not join the procession of the Dead in the Underworld but directly join the ranks of the gods.

    The ranks of the gods of which pantheon? Would I be able to meet them in Orlanth’s Hall or Ernalda’s loom house? Some of them, or all of them?

    And, out of curiosity, was there ever an individual from God Forgot who won the contest, and where did this person go?

    #6044
    Profile photo of Jeff Richard
    Jeff Richard
    Keymaster

    Pantheons are a scholarly creation (and the pantheons we have are a term of convenience to make it easier to play a game), so I wouldn’t over-analyze such artificial categories. Most people tend to divide the gods into “our gods” and “enemy gods”. Frex the Orlanthi recognize Yelm, Lodril, Kyger Litor, and Malkion as enemy gods, and further group the gods into loose categories of “Fire Tribe”, “Water Tribe”, and so on. But these categories are an attempt by humans to make sense of the Great Mystery, and often get contradicted by myth and by experience in the Otherworld. So caveat emptor.

    Belintar is acknowledged as a god by all the gods of the Holy Country. If you went to Orlanth’s place where only his cultists can go, then Belintar is not there. You have to go to Belintar’s House or Sethtalar’s Annex or wherever it is you want to pay your respects.

    And yes, Left Arm Islanders have won the contest, they have been apothesized with their own cult, and they are ignored by the rest of the Left Arm Islanders, who refuse to offer sacrifices or worship any god.

    #6046

    Sounds like there is sufficient material for a Stafford Library booklet about the History of the Holy Country, unless you have a project for a full HQ sourcebook. (Which I am not qualified to write, both for linguistic reasons and for too little practical experience creating HQ scenarios.)

    #6049
    Profile photo of Charles
    Charles
    Keymaster
    Quote:
    Now a living god is a strange thing. Such a being must exist in the God Time and the Mundane World simultaneously, with both a divine soul and a mortal body. Such beings are rare – I can think of very few offhand that meet that test in 1621…

    Very interesting list. In particular, what is interesting are the major cultures that do not have some form of representation on that list.

    Orlanthi – have somewhat known paths to achieve full god-hood.
    Westerners – don’t do the worship thing
    Dorradi – too sensible. “We tried that…”
    Hsunchen – Harrek left being a Hsunchen behind so they are half-on and half-off this list

    #6050
    Profile photo of Runeblogger
    Runeblogger
    Spectator

    There must have been an elf version of Belintar, since in the old website there was a text attributed to Belintar about elves in which he states something like: “this I learnt from the time I was an elf”. ;P

    #6052
    Quote:
    Quote from Rungard on October 11, 2013, 19:58
    There must have been an elf version of Belintar, since in the old website there was a text attributed to Belintar about elves in which he states something like: “this I learnt from the time I was an elf”. ;P

    The Holy Country doesn’t have any major Aldryami population, so that experience might predate Belintar’s arrival in Kethaela during the Closing.

    #6055
    Profile photo of Simon Phipp
    Simon Phipp
    Spectator

    The Holy Country has an awful lot of forest though, especially in Caladraland.

    #6061
    Profile photo of Jeff Richard
    Jeff Richard
    Keymaster
    Quote:
    Quote from Joerg Baumgartner on October 11, 2013, 22:12

    Quote:
    Quote from Rungard on October 11, 2013, 19:58
    There must have been an elf version of Belintar, since in the old website there was a text attributed to Belintar about elves in which he states something like: “this I learnt from the time I was an elf”. ;P

    The Holy Country doesn’t have any major Aldryami population, so that experience might predate Belintar’s arrival in Kethaela during the Closing.

    I’m pretty sure an Aldryami from the Old Woods (which is right on the northern edge of Esrolia) has won the Tournament of MoLaD. No dwarves or dragonewts have participated, let alone won.

    #6078
    Profile photo of David Scott
    David Scott
    Keymaster
    Quote:
    Quote from Rungard on October 11, 2013, 19:58
    There must have been an elf version of Belintar, since in the old website there was a text attributed to Belintar about elves in which he states something like: “this I learnt from the time I was an elf”. ;P

    You can find it here:

    http://www.glorantha.com/docs/aldryas-own-story/

    #6089
    Profile photo of Roko Joko
    Roko Joko
    Spectator

    Much of that text and a bit more also appeared here:
    http://ruleonemagazine.com/Iss9/WorldOfPlants.php

    #6124
    Profile photo of Daniel
    Daniel
    Spectator
    Quote:
    Quote from Jeff Richard on October 11, 2013, 08:16Now a living god is a strange thing. Such a being must exist in the God Time and the Mundane World simultaneously, with both a divine soul and a mortal body. Such beings are rare – I can think of very few offhand that meet that test in 1621: the Red Emperor, Jar-eel, Great Sister, Send Valu, Harrek the Berserk, Jaldon Goldentooth, Androgeus, Ralzakark, Cragspider, Ironhoof, Godunya, Can Shu, Dech Oru, the Emperor of Vormain, Seseine Kalig, Estengitorox, Terthinus the Voice of the Deep, and Bevilt Chaosfire. Some of these might not meet that test, and there might be a few I overlooked. But that list is less than twenty. And of that list, five are Chaotic (which is not a good thing!). Each one is very different and probably should be considered a class by themselves.

    So there is some overlap between the concepts of a living god and a superhero? Or rather, is there any difference between the two? Does it come down to power level and how well-established one is?

    #6128
    Profile photo of Charles
    Charles
    Keymaster

    I asked a similar question some time back. Basically, the word Superhero now has different connotations now than it had when Greg originally used the word in Red Moon and White Bear. I think that it is better to talk of more powerful and less powerful Heroes.
    Some of the more powerful Heroes are demi-gods or living gods.
    What differentiates a powerful Hero from a Demi-god? I believe that the answer is that a Demi-god has at least two different manifestations, i.e. at least a mundane and a separate magical manifestation. The presence of a magical or God Time manifestation allows the being to be worshipped in some form and in return provide magic to followers.

    #6131
    Profile photo of Peter Metcalfe
    Peter Metcalfe
    Spectator

    The trouble is with your definition is that hero has been used in recent sources (ie Book of Heortling Mythology) to describe people who are now worshipped (eg Heort, Amprefense etc) while Demigod is (in the Guide) used to describe extremely powerful people who are not necessarily worshipped (the Luatha, the Full Moon Corps).

    Hence I would use Hero to describe a) a worshipped person and b) an extremely powerful person (ie worthy of a counter on White Bear and Red Moon) on our side while using demigod to refer to an extremely powerful person on the enemy side.

    One can become a worshipped hero without being an extremely powerful person (I struggle to imagine how Dilfar the Deepsighted, say, would have fared in battle and I do not believe that it is necessary to be worshipped hero in order to be an extremely powerful person (I’m thinking of Harrek here).

    #6133
    Profile photo of Jeff Richard
    Jeff Richard
    Keymaster

    From the Guide”
    “These Heroes were part of the mortal world, but also somehow set apart from other mortals, often by their great power but sometimes for their great compassion, humor, or cleverness as well. They all shared two common features: agelessness and worship.
    Glorantha’s stories and histories are full of people whose life span is obviously much longer than normal. They escape the aging process, and unless they meet death from external causes, do not grow older or suffer the effects of age. However, agelessness is not the same as true immortality – Heroes may be killed. That may be easier said than done; besides being extremely powerful, most Heroes discovered paths out of the Underworld in the process of achieving their status.”

    A demigod is a magically powerful person, usually – but not always – a hero who exists on both the mundane world and the Otherworld simultaneously (like Harrek, Jar-eel, or Androgeus).

    #6134
    Profile photo of Simon Phipp
    Simon Phipp
    Spectator

    The following have, I believe, been described as SuperHeroes when they were alive:
    Arkat
    Sheng Seleris
    Yanafal Tarnils

    The ones listed by Jeff are of similar ilk. They are combat-oriented rather than being simply magical. Heroes such as the Red Emperor or Cragspider are powerful in their own ways and are worshipped, but are not as powerful in combat as the SuperHeroes. Even someone like Ironhoof and Argrath are nowhere near as powerful in combat as the SuperHeroes.

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